winter-spring-summer-fall

As a women leader, it’s easy to get caught up in overwhelm that leads to depletion.

But what if there was a way to create that could help you conserve energy?

Shamans and soulful leaders know a secret: timing is everything when it comes to conserving energy. When you observe nature, you understand how important it is to follow the laws of creation so nature can work for you instead of against you.

Imbolc, for instance, which begins February 1, was celebrated by my Celtic ancestors as the birth of spring. During this season, it’s a bit early to plant seeds, but it’s not too early to plan your dream garden. The key to conserving energy is to follow the seasonal circle in the appropriate order: winter, spring, summer, autumn. This is both literal and figurative.

What Happens When You Go Out of Order?

Imagine you’re growing vegetables to feed your family. How much energy would you waste digging a hole in a frozen field in December because you were impatient and in a hurry? Even if you managed to plant the seeds, they would never grow and you’d have to start all over again in spring. Doing the steps out of order—or staying stuck in a particular season—wastes energy.

For instance, if you’re a woman CEO and you finish a huge project, you might be tempted to start a new one immediately. But if you do that, you go from “Autumn Harvest” to “Spring Planting” and you don’t have the regenerative period of “Winter Rest” to help you sustain the momentum. If you continue to do this, you’ll likely end up feeling burned out and depleted. In order to truly reap the benefits of “Spring Planting” season, you need to first lie fallow. Just like a real garden.

What does this mean practically? It means relaxing at night doing something that regenerates you. It means getting a good nights sleep, which might mean letting go of some habits that make sleeping difficult (e.g. no caffeine after noon).

What to Do During Each Season

WINTER: Rest and plan during the dark times when it’s difficult to do anything else. (This could be winter, the new moon, nighttime, or the period after a death.)

SPRING: Plant ideas when the time is ripe for germination. (This could be spring, the waxing moon, morning, or when you’re ready to start a new project.)

SUMMER: Tend your ideas and bring them to fruition. (This could be summer, the full moon, daytime, or when you’re actively growing a project.)

AUTUMN: Harvest when the fruits of your labor have finished growing. (This could be autumn, the waning moon, evening, or when you’re finishing a project.)

Then you start all over again.

Of course, you may be going through the seasonal wheel at different times for different areas of your life. You may be in winter, grieving, after a loved one dies, while simultaneously in the heat of summer with a project that is reaching the pinnacle of its growth.

You might wake up feeling refreshed, work for awhile, then feel tired, even though the project is far from finished. That’s a mini-cycle within a bigger cycle.

Be mindful of tending to the various cycles you’re going through so you’re honoring your whole self. You will experience cycles within cycles. A day has all four seasons. A year long project has all for seasons and many mini-seasons. Know where you are in each situation so you can create and conserve energy at the same time.

Conclusion

When you go against the flow of nature, you expend more energy and you end up feeling overwhelmed. Doing any of these steps out of order or during the wrong time of year (literally or figuratively) can result in feelings of depletion.

The good news is that when you observe the laws of nature in every aspect of your life, you conserve energy and the natural rhythms help you live the full expression of your soul with ease.